S3E13 The Myth of Access [Deeper dive]

On December 30th, 2021, the most destructive wildfire on Colorado's history ripped through Boulder County, where @emily_braucher lives. The way in which the community has responded to support fire victims has been both incredible and troubling. Today we examine the question of our future: How we can create climate related disaster recovery that’s more equitable?

Whether it’s COVID, fires or floods, when you really look at who’s affected the most in the US, there’s a glaring difference there between white people and BIPOC and it isn’t just access to medical care that’s to blame. In today’s episode, we’re diving deeper into our last episode with Vani Tangella, a race equity specialist with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, where we discussed how trauma affects race conversations and experiences. Join us as we unpack the myth of access in the US, the often overlooked ways it makes a big difference, and why we need to put more focus on increasing equity in the face of climate-related disasters.

LISTEN HERE: https://link.chtbl.com/YkJrQIk8

We’re diving into:

Social capital and how it affects access to Americans
What it means to be an “other” in the face of a natural disaster
How we can create climate related disaster recovery that’s more equitable
What more equitable treatment of communities, whether marginalized or not, BEFORE a disaster would mean for the outcomes and recovery
Metabolizing trauma: why it’s so important and how the lack of access to it comes into play for many Black and Brown bodies
And more!

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